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Lowriders

Lowrider: Are very often classic cars from the 1950s which rode low to begin with, and to a lesser degree newer vehicles. The word is also used to refer to those who drive or own such cars. Lowriders are very often flashy, show-quality custom vehicles. The exteriors typically feature expensive custom paintjobs (the best are often referred to as candy) that consist of several thin layers of different colors, metal oxide flake or pearl flake, clear coat, metal leaf, airbrushed murals or script, pinstripes, flames or any other hand-painted graphics, or any combination of the above. Lowriders traditionally feature small (to be able to tuck beneath the wheelwell and allow the lowest ride height), gold or chrome spoke wheels with or without knockoffs and whitewall tires. Other common custom exterior enhancements are; body kits or skirts, extensive use of chrome or gold, neon or LED lights, curb-feelers, tinted windows, antennas or fins, spoilers, and fifth wheels (a full matching spare on display). The most detailed vehicles have engine, exhaust and performance modifications and/or beautifications.
Custom interiors are also very popular and are most commonly fabricated in leather, tweed, or velvet. Other common custom interior enhancements are; the use of woodgrain panels or interior paint, neon or LED lights, chrome or gold accents, cosmetic mirrors, aftermarket steering wheels (of which a chain-link steering wheel is iconic). Many lowriders now feature any combination of mobile electronic audio and video devices, most stereotypically a loud audio system that features a powerful amp and large subs (or woofers) and primarily focuses on producing massive amounts of bass.
Many Lowriders feature custom hydraulic suspension or an air bag system that allows the driver to alter the ride height at will. These systems range from simple to complex and are usually measured by the amount of switches used to control the various hydraulic combinations that ultimately produce a specific motion from the vehicle. The most common motions are dipping/raising the four corners of the vehicle (referred to as corners), dipping/raising the front or rear of the vehicle (front, back), dipping/raising the sides of the vehicles (side to side), and lowering/raising the vehicle as a whole (pancake). A skilled switch operator can manipulate his controls (hitting switches) to raise one wheel completely off the ground (3-wheel motion), or to bounce one end of the car completely off the ground.. About tuners, east coast lowriders

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